Preservice teachers" attitudes and self-reported behaviours toward learning and behavioural problems in children
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Preservice teachers" attitudes and self-reported behaviours toward learning and behavioural problems in children by Nezihe Elik

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Published .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Student teachers -- Attitudes.,
  • Problem children.,
  • Learning disabled children.,
  • Teacher-student relationships.

Book details:

About the Edition

This dissertation includes 2 studies that investigated 274 preservice teachers" attitudes and self-reported behaviours toward children with learning and behavioural problems (LBP). The overarching objective of these studies was to understand the variables that predict more positive self-reported behaviours toward children with LBP. Attitudes, in this dissertation, refer to beliefs and emotions, and behaviours refer to immediate reactions and planned behaviours. In the two studies, beliefs and self-reported planned behaviours were evaluated along the interventionist continuum, emotions were evaluated along the positive-negative continuum, and self-reported immediate reactions were evaluated along the punitive continuum. Study I investigated relationships among beliefs, emotions, and self-reported immediate reactions and planned behaviours through path analyses based on Stanovich"s adaptation of Ajzen"s theory of planned action. Relationships between preservice teachers" attitudes and self-reported behaviours and the type of problematic student behaviour were investigated using scenarios describing children with learning problems, inattention, hyperactivity, and defiant behaviours. Study II investigated the relationship between preservice teachers" motivation to learn about children with LBP and their thinking dispositions, with their attitudes and self-reported behaviours.The results showed that preservice teachers" immediate reactions, but not planned behaviours, were predicted by their beliefs and emotions. Preservice teachers reported more interventionist beliefs, positive emotions, and non-punitive immediate reactions toward scenarios describing children with learning and attention problems than toward scenarios describing children with hyperactivity and defiant behaviours. Overall, female participants" responses toward children with LBP were more positive than male participants". Preservice teachers" self-reported interventionist planned behaviours were predicted by their motivation to learn and open-minded thinking dispositions, which also were significantly associated with interventionist beliefs, positive emotions, and self-reported non-punitive immediate reactions. Implications of these findings for treatment of children with LBP, teacher education programs, and future research are discussed.

Edition Notes

Statementby Nezihe Elik.
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 176 leaves :
Number of Pages176
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21356485M
ISBN 109780494218792
OCLC/WorldCa394840447

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